Watch TV with a Critical Eye

Edited by Jasmin, Maria, Eng

How To Watch TV with a Critical Eye

Do you ever read television reviews or listen to critics talk about an episode of TV, and feel as though the analyses go a little over your head? Or perhaps you understand the analysis but wish you had been more perceptive to those concepts when you were watching the episode or show in question? Don't despair; though not everyone can be a TV critic, everyone can learn to watch TV through a critical lens.

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To get started, you need a basic understanding of televisual literacy. That is, you need to know the components of a TV show. Once you understand the essentials, you can begin to unpack the information being conveyed and examine it further. Pick an episode of any show and watch it before, during, and after you read this article so you can apply these tips in a practical setting.

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Characters.

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    These are the people who allow us to connect with the story world of every show.
    On some level they should be relatable, or at the very least recognizable. They need strengths, weaknesses, and vulnerabilities. Fully formed, three-dimensional characters can often save even the most poorly plotted shows from being total failures.
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  2. 2
    Determine whether the show you're watching has characters you feel an emotional connection with.
    Do you feel invested in these characters' future? If yes, consider why you feel that way. Can you see yourself in them? What about their dialogue or actions makes you want to see more? If not, consider what's missing from these characters that stops you from feeling engaged.
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  3. 3
    Character arcs are very important.
    An arc is when a character begins as one type of person and, in response to obstacles or story developments, they make small or large changes to become a slightly new type of person. The character doesn't need to be radically different at the end of the arc, just exhibit an ability to overcome and evolve. Characters who maintain the same status quo for too long become stagnant and uninteresting.
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  4. 4
    Watch for inconsistencies known as character breaks.
    This is what happens when a character does something that doesn't seem authentic to them. The longer you've known a character the easier it will be to spot. It typically occurs when characters are sacrificed in the name of a joke or plot point. Even though the joke makes no sense coming from a particular character, the writers (or producers) just can't part with the line. Equally as offensive is when a plot point needs an easy resolution, so a character says or does something completely inauthentic to themselves for the sheer purpose of tidying up plot.
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  5. 5
    Look out for characters that are just walking, talking stereotypes.
    These were far more common in the past, but they still rear their ugly heads today. It's any character who presents an oversimplified image of a particular person or group. It's often race or gender based, and it's an example of very poor, lazy, and usually discriminatory writing. The only time a stereotype can improve television, is when they are used to satirize or subvert the status quo.
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  6. 6
    Learn to distinguish between bad characters and bad acting.
    Sometimes a character is great on the page but the actor portraying them doesn't bring any life to them on screen. If all other elements of a show seem to mesh well but one character continues to fall flat, the fault is most likely in the acting. It could also be the complete reverse; a great actor doing all they can with subpar material. If a character continues to shine despite being surrounded by plot holes and rigid dialogue, the actor is likely to thank. It's not an easy thing to identify at first but it gets a lot easier with practice. When you notice particularly poor or great writing, lookup the writer's name and check out a few other episodes they've written. Watching the same actor in different roles is helpful as well. You might discover that an actor or writer was only great, or not so great, in one situation. The problem then, could be with the direction of the episode.
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Direction & Visual Language

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    Everything you see on screen is part of a show's visual language.
    The actors, props, lighting, color scheme, everything. Though the showrunner has final say over every aspect of their show, the director is still responsible for the majority of what viewers see and how they see it on their screen. Understanding why things are being presented in such particular ways is a pretty important concept in critical viewing of television. It's the visual in visual storytelling.
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  2. 2
    Television shows have their own unique visual style.
    Every episode will have some manner of consistency to its lighting, camera angles, editing, dialogue delivery, etc. When something feels out of place, and not in a deliberate way, it can be the fault of direction. As mentioned before in regards to characters and acting, an offbeat character moment may be attributed to a director's instructions.
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  3. 3
    Look for cues and clues about what's being telegraphed by means of camerawork.
    • Slow motion could be an attempt at heightening tension or emotions. If used too often or in an ill-suited moment, it can be jarring or even unintentionally humorous.
    • Focus can be manipulated to guide our attention, away from or towards a particular character or set piece.
    • Close-ups or shots that linger on a character's face can be used to increase our intimacy with them, or provide further details about a current situation. By contrast, the further the camera takes us from a character, the less intimacy we can develop with them. This could be an effort of depicting a character who is guarded or emotionally closed off.
    • Quick cuts can be used to ramp up suspense, or give the viewer a sense of disorientation. The latter is sometimes purposefully and effective, sometimes not.
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  4. 4
    Color schemes and palettes can be used to convey tone, add character depth, or indicate flashbacks or flash-forwards.
    Mad Men was very deliberate in its use of color and style, taking cues from a real time in our history. Think of the bright charm on display in the Draper home, which was used as an excellent contrast to Don and Betty's actual dark and gloomy behavior and emotions.
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Plot & Dialogue

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    All stories need structure.
    Though a good number of television shows are trying their hand at character-motivated stories, plot is still at the heart of it all. A show still needs a story, no matter how basic or complex it may be.
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  2. 2
    Movement of plot is key.
    When a show has pacing issues, it's likely because its plot moves too fast or too slow, or vacillates between the two extremes. Narrative arcs, which are much the same as character arcs, help move the plot forward. They should exist within every episode to varying degrees. Trouble presents itself, the trouble climaxes, and then the trouble is resolved. Trouble can be small or large; it just has to present conflict because that's what fuels a story and its movement. To be clear: plot that moves slow or fast is fine, but it has to find some kind of balance so an audience isn't left bored or completely bewildered (in the bad way) by what they just saw.
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  3. 3
    Be aware of false conflict.
    For example: if something can be resolved simply by having two characters talk to one another, then the trouble at hand is false conflict.
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  4. 4
    How is the story being told?
    Is the plot linear and chronological, or non-linear and out of chronological order? Non-linear storytelling can be used to detail past events of a character's life, to give hints towards the story's future, or add an element of perplexity to the plot. If successful, it's typically a very rewarding structure. When unsuccessful, it can be disastrous for the show. For example: when used only as a narrative hook, something to keep the audience coming back, but never winds up having any real substance it can be very souring for viewers.
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  5. 5
    What themes are being presented?
    Literally any theme could be present in both singular episodes of a show or in its overall narrative. Try to identify at least one theme in your chosen episode and explore how it helps to give weight to the story and its characters. Are themes presented and then subverted or contradicted? Did this elevate or damage the larger statement being made?
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  6. 6
    Dialogue should always add something to a scene.
    There's no need for characters to ramble on, unless that's a legitimate part of who they are. It should feel natural and hold meaning, not be silly or void of purpose. When exposition is absolutely necessary, it should be as quick and to the point as possible. When expository dialogue is used, examine whether it was an instance where the episode could have shown rather than told us all the details. This problem is especially apparent in pilot episodes that have a lot of setup to accomplish.
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Music & Sound

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    Everything you hear in an episode of television.
    This includes original scores, song choices, sound design, and sound effects. It's widely believed that if a show's sound is any good, you won't notice it. This is true in some senses, like when a sound effect is so ill fitting it causes confusion. But in some cases, music and sound becomes so entangled with the rest of a show's elements it's impossible to ignore.
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  2. 2
    A well-placed song can amplify everything about a scene.
    An ill-timed song can throw viewers off and take them out of the story completely. Sometimes a cheerful song can be used to highlight the dark or depressing context of a scene. When done well it can be haunting, when done poorly it can be laughable.
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  3. 3
    Two shows that have essentially made a character out of their original scores are The Leftovers and Westworld.
    From early on in both, they use their score in certain ways to almost train the viewer in what to expect. By the finale of each season, the first note of these scores can bring you to tears or make you feel excited.
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  4. 4
    An excellent use of sound, or lack of I should say, is in an episode from Buffy the Vampire Slayer's fourth season, titled "Hush." I highly recommend watching this episode to see how even the absence of sound can count as superb work with sound.
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Read reviews & listen to podcasts.

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    Immersing yourself in the world of television criticism is the quickest way to learn.
    No matter how long you practice developing your own skills, there will inevitably be details you don't pick up on or don't perceive in a particular way. We all come with our own set of biases, after all. So, keep reading and listening to what other people have to say. If nothing else, it may help confirm that you're on the right track.
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  2. 2
    Check out this VisiHow article for a list of my favorite TV critics and podcasts.
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Watch More TV!

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    When getting started, re-watch episodes of shows you already know very well.
    By having a prior grasp on the subject material, you allow yourself to focus elsewhere on aspects like directorial choices and nuances in performances.
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  2. 2
    Cultivate your TV palate.
    Gain an understanding of what's considered great television by watching some of the highest rated shows, past and present. When you know what television is truly capable of, in all aspects, you can use that knowledge as a helpful gage to determine how other TV measures up. My personal recommendations for this activity are:
    • The Wire
    • Breaking Bad
    • The Leftovers
    • Atlanta
    • Orphan Black
    • Happy Valley
    • Arrested Development
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  3. 3
    Watch as much television as possible.
    Watching a lot of TV can help you get into the rhythm of watching critically. Through repetition, it will familiarize you with patterns and tropes so they become more easily recognizable. Eventually you'll be quick at discerning between what's original and what's cliché.
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  4. 4
    Diversify your lineup.
    Watching many different styles of television will be even further beneficial. If you only ever consume comedies, then that's all you'll ever get a firm grasp on. If you watch comedies, drama, sci-fi, fantasy, etc., you'll start understanding how different shows "work." It's especially fun when you start noticing how genres overlap and when a particular show is bringing something new to the table. Of course, you can always spend more time consuming a genre you love, but to gain a truly critical eye you need to cast a wider net.
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Television has grown into a medium that's worthy of our active engagement and criticism, in much the same way literary texts have been receiving for centuries. It's established itself as a means of connecting with and drawing parallels to our society and culture. Even if a television show is simply telling a story though, it still holds value; story is a fairly universally loved concept. If visual storytelling is something you feel particularly passionate about, learning to watch it critically can only enhance your enjoyment. Sure, once you become more practiced in it, you might eventually discover a show you once loved isn't all that great. But you will undoubtedly also develop an even deeper appreciation for many other shows.

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Watch TV with a Critical Eye. (2017). In VisiHow. Retrieved Mar 23, 2017, from http://visihow.com/Watch_TV_with_a_Critical_Eye

MLA (Modern Language Association) "Watch TV with a Critical Eye." VisiHow, visihow.com/Watch_TV_with_a_Critical_Eye Accessed 23 Mar 2017.

Chicago / Turabian VisiHow.com. "Watch TV with a Critical Eye." Accessed Mar 23, 2017. http://visihow.com/Watch_TV_with_a_Critical_Eye.

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Categories : Entertainment

Recent edits by: Maria, Jasmin

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