Sign Your Name

Edited by Train Wreck, Eng, VisiHow

Your handwriting tells other people a lot about you. This is especially true of your signature. Therefore, it's a good idea to make your signature look professional. In fact, depending on your occupation, you may find yourself signing your name frequently. If this is the case, you'll want to make sure that you give people the right impression. In this article, we will discuss how you can make your signature look professional when signing your name. We will also discuss some elements that you should avoid in your signature if your goal is to project professionalism. As a bonus, we've added a section on making a professional email signature at the end of this article.

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Tips for your handwritten signature

  1. 1
    Capitalize first letters.
    For both your first name and surname as well as your middle name or initial, if used, you should capitalize the beginning letters. If you write your name entirely in lowercase letters, you risk communicating a lack of confidence.
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  2. 2
    Be mindful of the size of your signature.
    As far as possible, match the size of your signature to the rest of your handwritten document. If your signature is obviously a much larger size than the rest of your writing, the reader may get the impression that you are arrogant. If your signature is notably smaller than the remainder of your document, however, the reader may get the impression that you are timid and lack the confidence to stand up for yourself.
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  3. 3
    Pay attention to the slant of your signature.
    Handwriting that has an upward slant is seen as indicating openness and optimism, while handwriting that has a downward slant indicates negativity and potentially a lack of self-esteem.
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What to avoid with handwritten signatures

  1. 1
    Avoid unnecessary strokes.
    If you create a strikethrough signature with one or many lines, remove this element and work on creating a signature with a clean appearance. Strokes that cross our or strike through your name are seen as indicating low self-esteem as well as a potential tendency to self-harm. Doodles, such as hearts and smiles, should also be removed from a professional signature, as they will not give a reader the impression that you are serious and responsible.
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  2. 2
    Avoid exaggerated lower loops.
    In letters that dip below the baseline, such as 'g', 'j', or 'y'; make sure the loop that is created below the baseline is proportional to the rest of your signature. Using lower loops that are too large indicates that you are materialistic and chasing money.
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  3. 3
    Avoid scribbling.
    A scribbled signature, while extremely common, indicates to the reader that the person writing it is arrogant or constantly rushing and never has time. A reader could think that you will never have enough time to complete your work, attend an important meeting or event, or have a discussion with him or her. When you are trying to make a good impression, it may be better to make sure your signature is legible. Additionally, make sure that your signature is legible and scribble-free from beginning to end. Ending your signature with a scribble may look cool, but it may also send an alarming signal to a hiring manager, potential business partner, or other person in your professional network. This type of signature may indicate that you do not end on a high note; rather, part of the way through a project, you may have a tendency to relax, coast to the end, and negate all of your hard work.
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Make your e-mail signature look professional

With your e-mail signature, keep in mind that shorter is better. Especially these days, when your recipient may be reading from a mobile device, it is best to have a simple signature that can easily and quickly be read. Your recipient may become frustrated if they have to scroll through several lines to get the information he or she needs. The basic elements of your e-mail signature are indicated below.

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  1. 1
    Your Name, Title, and Company.
    Begin with your name and title and company. You will need to start your email signature with your first and last name as well as a title or designation, if available. If you are currently working, you should also include the name of your company.
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  2. 2
    Your Contact Information.
    On the next line, include your contact information. Definitely include your full telephone number. Do not forget country and area codes, especially if you are writing to someone in a different location. You may also include a hyperlink with your e-mail address. While professionals may disagree with whether or not an e-mail address in your signature is necessary, it may not hurt to add this piece of information. You want to make yourself easy to contact when you are trying to do business or get hired for a new job.
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  3. 3
    Your Company Logo.
    Consider adding a logotype. If you are currently employed, your company may provide you with a logo or banner to place in your e-mail signature. If you are provided with a company logo or banner, use it. If you are not currently working, this can be left out.
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For all of the above points, it's best to remember to keep your font a readable size and font. Avoid inspirational quotes and other unnecessary information. You may also want to avoid using HTML formatting when you create your signature, as the final product may not look the same for all recipients.

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Additional Tips

It is a good idea to work on a professional signature, as well as practice your handwriting. The closer the appearance of your signature is to your handwriting, the more you will be viewed as honest and trustworthy. Your signature may be the only glimpse of your handwriting another person sees; you will want to make sure that impression is a good one, and a reflection of your true self. For business situations in which e-mail is used as opposed to handwriting, an e-mail signature that is simple and contains only necessary information will be the most beneficial. It's important to remember that once you've chosen a signature, you can still make changes to it.

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See other tutorials on writing and letters: Create a Cool Signature, Address an Envelope for an Apology Letter, Fold a Letter, Write an Apology Letter to Your Husband, Write an Apology Letter to Your Boss or Company, Fold a Letter, Address an Envelope for an Apology Letter, Write a Letter of Apology, and Write a Letter of Pleading.

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Article Info

Categories : Writing

Recent edits by: Eng, Train Wreck

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