Read and Write Consonants in Arabic

Edited by Hotelier, priya, Rushell, Eng

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Alif Baa Taa Thaa

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. In today's tutorial, we will begin a series on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet. This is Part 1, and we will go through each letter so that those of you who are not native speakers can see how the letters are pronounced.

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Steps

  1. 1
    In the small column on the right-hand side, we will show how to write the letters as they appear in the alphabet on their own
    .
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  2. 2
    Everything to the left of the black line will be showing how the letters connect to each other in a word
    .
    Arabic is written from right to left, and letters have either two or three forms.
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  3. 3
    The alphabet begins with the letter "alif", which is written as a line straight from the top to the bottom
    .
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  4. 4
    "Alif" will connect to any letters on its right side, but it will not connect to any letter on its left
    .
    For this reason, we have a beginning "alif", which does not connect to any letters. We would need to pick up our pen, leave a space, and continue with any other letters.
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  5. 5
    We can also have an ending "alif", which will have some letters, and then a straight line over and up
    .
    This is the ending "alif" at the end of the word.
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  6. 6
    The next letters are "baa", "taa" and "thaa"
    .
    These three letters have the same basic shape.
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  7. 7
    "Baa" has a single dot just below this basic shape
    .
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  8. 8
    "Taa" has two dots above this basic shape
    .
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  9. 9
    "Thaa" has three dots above in the shape of a pyramid or a triangle
    .
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  10. 10
    "Baa", "taa" and "thaa" also connect to letters in a word in this same way
    .
    Beginning "baa" then has any letters connecting directly to it.
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  11. 11
    We have middle "baa" with any letters on both the right and the left sides
    .
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  12. 12
    Then, we have ending "baa" with letters appearing only on the right side
    .
    This would "baa" at the end of the word.
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  13. 13
    "Taa" and "thaa" look identical in shape to the way we have just written "baa", just with the dots in their respective places
    .
    We have beginning "taa".
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  14. 14
    We have middle "taa"
    .
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  15. 15
    Then, we have ending "taa"
    .
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  16. 16
    We also have beginning "thaa"
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  17. 17
    We have middle "thaa"
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  18. 18
    Then we have ending "thaa"
    .
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  19. 19
    This concludes today's tutorial, part 1, on reading and writing in the Arabic alphabet
    .
    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Alif Baa Taa Thaa

Jiim Haa Khaa

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing the Arabic language. If you are a non-native speaker, and you've always wondered how to read and write in Arabic, we are going through the alphabet letter by letter from beginning to end. This is so that we can see how the letters are pronounce and how they are written by themselves. Also, to the left of the black line, we will show how they connect to other letters when they are forming words. Arabic is written from the right side to the left side. This is Part 2, and we are discussing the next three letters of the alphabet, which are "jiim", "haa" and "khaa".

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Steps

  1. 1
    These three letters have the same basic shape
    .
    We will start by placing our pen down, going up and curving around slightly.
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  2. 2
    Then, we will go down to make a half circle
    .
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  3. 3
    We'll make the same shape for the other two letters, "haa" and "khaa", as well
    .
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  4. 4
    We can tell these letters apart by the placement of dots
    .
    "Jiim" has a single dot that is placed just inside the half circle, below the top.
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  5. 5
    "Haa" does not have any dot
    .
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  6. 6
    "Khaa" is written with a single dot just above the letter
    .
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  7. 7
    These letters look similar as they stand alone
    .
    They also connect to other letters in the same way. These letters do connect from both sides, so each one has a beginning form, a middle form, and an end form.
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  8. 8
    For beginning "jiim", we can start by making the curve
    .
    Then, instead of making the half circle, we can simply extend the line. Beginning "jiim" has a line extending out instead of curving down, and the dot placed below the line. This is at the beginning of the word.
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  9. 9
    We have middle "jiim" in the middle of the word, with the dot below
    .
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  10. 10
    Then, we have ending "jiim" at the very end of the word with the dot placed inside, and the half circle completed
    .
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  11. 11
    "Haa" and "khaa" look the same as the way we have just written "jiim"
    .
    "Haa" has no dots. We have beginning "haa".
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  12. 12
    We have middle "haa"
    .
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  13. 13
    Then, we have end "haa"
    .
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  14. 14
    "Khaa", we will make with the dot just above the letter in the same basic shape
    .
    We have beginning "khaa".
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  15. 15
    We have middle "khaa"
    .
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  16. 16
    Then, we have end "khaa"
    .
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  17. 17
    This does conclude today's tutorial on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet
    .
    This is Part 2 for the letters "jiim", "haa" and "khaa". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Jiim Haa Khaa

Daal Thaal Ra Za

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today, we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing in the Arabic alphabet. If you are a non-native speaker, and you always wanted to learn how to do this, we're going through the alphabet letter by letter, in order. You can learn how the letters are pronounced, how they are written as stand-alone letters, and to the left of the black line, how they connect to other letters in a word. We should remember that Arabic is written from the right side to the left side. This is Part 3, and we are talking about the four letters "daal", "thaal", "ra" and "za". "Daal" and "thaal" have the same basic shape. It looks like the bottom right-hand corner of a square with a slightly rounded edge.

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Steps

  1. 1
    "Daal" does not have any dots, but "thaal" does just above the basic form of the letter
    .
    "Thaal" is pronounced more closely to the "th" sound that we would hear in "the" or "than".
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  2. 2
    "Ra" and "za" have the same basic shape as well
    .
    For "ra", we will start at the line on the page, and then curve slightly down and to the left. It is the same with "za".
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  3. 3
    "Ra" is slightly rolled when pronouncing it
    .
    We can see that it's similar to "daal" because it does not have a dot. However, "za" is similar to "thaal" because it does have a single dot just above the basic shape of the letter. This is how we can tell these two sets of letters apart.
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  4. 4
    All four of these letters connect to other letters in the same way
    .
    Letters on the right will connect to "daal", "thaal", "ra" and "za", but none of these letters will connect to another letter on the left side. So each letter has a beginning form, and an ending form.
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  5. 5
    We have beginning "daal"
    .
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  6. 6
    Then we have ending "daal"
    .
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  7. 7
    We will have the same basic form with the dot for the letter "thaal"
    .
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  8. 8
    "Ra" and "za" will also look similar
    .
    We have beginning "ra".
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  9. 9
    Then we have ending "ra"
    .
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  10. 10
    We have beginning "za"
    .
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  11. 11
    Then we have ending "za"
    .
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  12. 12
    This concludes today's tutorial on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet
    .
    This is Part 3, letters "daal", "thaal", "ra" and "za". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Daal Thaal Ra Za

Siin Shiin Saad Daad

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing in the Arabic alphabet. If you are a non-native speaker, and you have always wanted to learn how to do this, we're going through each letter one by one, in order. We're learning how they are pronounced, how they are written as stand-alone letters, and to the left of the black line, how they connect to other letters in a word. We can recall from previous parts of this tutorial that Arabic is written from the right side to the left side. This is Part 4, and we will be discussing the four letters "siin", "shiin", "saad" and "daad".

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Steps

  1. 1
    "Siin" and "shiin" have the same basic letter shape
    .
    We will start up, and curve down once to make a small "You".
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  2. 2
    Then, we will bring it down again a second time
    .
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  3. 3
    Then, we'll bring it down again, but make a larger curve
    .
    Let's make the same basic shape for the letter "shiin".
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  4. 4
    "Siin" does not have any dots, but "shiin" has three
    .
    They are made in a triangle just about the first curve.
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  5. 5
    "Saad" and "daad" have the same basic shape as well
    .
    For "saad", we'll start on the line of the paper, and come up to the right to make a small oval. Make sure to connect it together.
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  6. 6
    Then make the same larger curve at the bottom
    .
    We'll do the same for the letter "daad".
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  7. 7
    "Saad" is like "siin" in that it does not have any dots
    .
    "Daad" has a single dot just above the oval on the right side.
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  8. 8
    All four of these letters connect to other letters on both sides
    .
    "Siin" and "shiin" connect in a similar way. "Saad" and "daad" also connect in a similar way. We have beginning "siin", where we will make the beginning part with the two little curves. However, we will not add the larger curve at the end.
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  9. 9
    We will simply connect the two little curves onto another letter
    .
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  10. 10
    For middle "siin", we will add a line just to the right side of the two little curves
    .
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  11. 11
    For ending "siin", we will keep the line on the right side, but make the connecting line into the larger curve at the end of the stand-alone letter
    .
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  12. 12
    We'll make the same basic shape for the letter "shiin"
    .
    We have beginning "shiin".
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  13. 13
    We have middle "shiin"
    .
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  14. 14
    Then, we have ending "shiin"
    .
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  15. 15
    For "saad" and "daad", the beginning and the middle forms have only the piece on the right side, which looks kind of like an oval or an ellipse
    .
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  16. 16
    We'll start with our line on the page, bring it slightly up, and connect it together
    .
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  17. 17
    Then, go back down, and connect onto the left side
    .
    This is beginning "saad".
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  18. 18
    In middle "saad", we'll add a line coming from the right side, and then continue onto the left
    .
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  19. 19
    For ending "saad", we will keep the line on the right side, but we will add a larger curve at the bottom
    .
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  20. 20
    We can make the same general shape with the dot in the right place for the letter "daad"
    .
    We have beginning "daad".
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  21. 21
    We have middle "daad"
    .
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  22. 22
    Then we have ending "daad"
    .
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  23. 23
    This concludes today's tutorial on reading and writing in the Arabic alphabet
    .
    This is Part 4, dealing with the letters "siin", "shiin", "saad" and "daad". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Siin Shiin Saad Daad

Taa Thaa Ayn Ghayn

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet. If you are a non-native speaker, and you have always wanted to learn how to do this, we are going through the alphabet letter by letter, in order. You can learn how the letters are pronounced, how they are written as stand-alone letters, and to the left of the black line, how they connect to other letters to make a word. This is Part 5, and we will be discussing four letters which are perhaps some of the most difficult to pronounce, especially for English speakers. These letters are "taa", "thaa", "ayn" and "ghayn". To write these letters, "taa" and "thaa" have the same basic shape. Similar to "saad" and "daad", which we saw in the previous section of this tutorial, we will start at the line, go up toward the right, and curve around.

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Steps

  1. 1
    However, this time, we will going slightly up at the back
    .
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  2. 2
    Then, we will make one line that goes straight from the bottom of the letter up
    .
    Again, this is letter "taa".
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  3. 3
    For "thaa", we will make the same shape, but we will add a small singular dot just above the curve
    .
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  4. 4
    For the letter "ayn", we will start from the right, curving a little up and to the left to make kind of a "C"
    .
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  5. 5
    Then, we will go back around to make a larger curve beneath it
    .
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  6. 6
    We will have the same basic shape for the letter "ghayn", just with a single dot just above it
    .
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  7. 7
    "Taa" and "thaa" connect in the same way for their beginning, middle and end forms
    .
    Beginning "taa" looks just like the stand-alone letter, and we will use other letters to connect onto its left-hand side.
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  8. 8
    For middle "taa", we will start with a line coming from the right, make our curve, and continue onto the left
    .
    Then, we will make a line straight up.
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  9. 9
    For ending "taa", we will have the same line coming from the right, and make our curve
    .
    It will look the same as the stand-alone letter at the end. Then, we will make a line going straight up.
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  10. 10
    "Thaa" will have the same form as "taa" for beginning, middle and end
    .
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  11. 11
    "Ayn" and "ghayn" also have the same basic form
    .
    For beginning "ayn", we will use only the top portion of the stand-alone letter.
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  12. 12
    Then, we will connect it onto the left side
    .
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  13. 13
    For middle "ayn", we will start from the right side, make a line, and go slightly up
    .
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  14. 14
    Then, we will bring it flat across the top
    .
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  15. 15
    Then, we will come back down, and continue onto the left side
    .
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  16. 16
    For ending "ayn", we will have the line from the right, and then make a circle
    .
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  17. 17
    Then, we will go down and make a larger curve at the bottom
    .
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  18. 18
    We will form the letter "ghayn" in the same way, with the dot directly above the top
    .
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  19. 19
    This does conclude today's tutorial on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet
    .
    This is Part 5, dealing with some of the most difficult to pronounce letters in the alphabet for English speakers. They are "taa", "thaa", "ayn" and "ghayn". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Taa Thaa Ayn Ghayn

Faa Qaaf Kaaf

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today, we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet. If you are a non-native speaker, and you have always wanted to learn how to do this, we are going through the alphabet letter by letter, in order. You can learn how letters are pronounced, how they are written as stand-alone letters, as well as to the left of the black line, how they connect to other letters in a word. This is Part 6. In this part of the series, we are going over the letters "faa", "qaaf" and "kaaf". These letters all do look different. Remember that Arabic is written from the right side to the left side.

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Steps

  1. 1
    For the letter "faa", we will make a small circle just on the line of the page
    .
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  2. 2
    Next, we will slide over to the left, and then curve slightly up
    .
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  3. 3
    Place a single dot just at the top of the circle
    .
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  4. 4
    For the letter "qaaf", we will make a small circle
    .
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  5. 5
    Then we will go below the line, and come up
    .
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  6. 6
    Then, place two dots just above the shape of the letter
    .
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  7. 7
    For "kaaf", we will make a larger half of a square
    .
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  8. 8
    Then, we will place a very small "S" shape, or a backwards "Z", just in the center
    .
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  9. 9
    These are the stand-alone forms of the letters
    .
    Each of these has a beginning, a middle, and an ending form.
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  10. 10
    For letter "faa", it will look very similar the stand-alone letter, but without the curve at the top
    .
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  11. 11
    We have beginning "faa" with the circle on the line, and continuing on to the left side, with the dot at the top
    .
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  12. 12
    For middle "faa", we will simply add a line that connects from the right side
    .
    We will make the circle, then continue on to the left.
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  13. 13
    For ending "faa", we will keep the line connecting from the right side, and add the same curve up, with the dot
    .
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  14. 14
    For "qaaf", it will look very similar to "faa" in style
    .
    We have our circle sitting on the line, connecting onto the left side, with two dots above.
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  15. 15
    Middle "qaaf" will look almost identical to middle "faa", but with two dots
    .
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  16. 16
    Ending "qaaf" will have the same line connecting from the right side
    .
    We will make our circle, then our curve below the line, and add the two dots.
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  17. 17
    "Kaaf" looks a little bit different
    .
    For the beginning, we will make the right side almost of a triangle.
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  18. 18
    Then, add a single line going up and to the right
    .
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  19. 19
    For middle "kaaf", we will add a line that connects from a letter on the right side
    .
    The basic shape will be the same.
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  20. 20
    Ending "kaaf" will look very similar to the stand-alone letter, but connected from the right side
    .
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  21. 21
    This concludes today's tutorial
    .
    This is reading and writing the Arabic alphabet, Part 6 for letters "faa", "qaaf" and "kaaf". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Faa Qaaf Kaaf

Laam Miim Nuun

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today, we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet. If you are a non-native speaker, and you have always wanted to learn this, we are going through the Arabic alphabet in order, letter by letter. You can see how each letter is pronounced, how it looks as a stand-alone letter, and to the left of the black line, how each letter connects to other letters in a word. We should remember from previous parts of this tutorial that Arabic is written from the right side to the left side. This is Part 7, and we are discussing the letters "laam", "miim" and "nuun", which are very similar in sound to the letters in English "L", "M" and "N".

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Steps

  1. 1
    To make the stand-alone letter "laam", we will start at the top as if we are writing the English letter "L"
    .
    Come down, and curve slightly the left.
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  2. 2
    Then come a little bit up
    .
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  3. 3
    For "miim", we will closer to the left-hand side
    .
    Come slightly up, and to the right in a half-circle.
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  4. 4
    Next, come straight over to the left
    .
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  5. 5
    Then curve down to make a tail
    .
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  6. 6
    For "nuun", we will make a half-circle
    .
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  7. 7
    Then place a small dot just above the center
    .
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  8. 8
    Each of these letters has a beginning, a middle, and an ending form, so they do connect to letters on both sides
    .
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  9. 9
    Beginning "laam" looks very similar to stand-alone "laam", except it does not curve below the line
    .
    It comes, instead, straight across.
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  10. 10
    Middle "laam" looks very similar, but adds a connecting line just on the right-hand side
    .
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  11. 11
    Ending "laam" has a connecting line from the right side, and goes into the stand-alone format
    .
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  12. 12
    Beginning "miim" is a small circle, continuing onto the left side
    .
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  13. 13
    For "miim" in the middle, we have a line coming from the right
    .
    Then we will stop.
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  14. 14
    Let's make a circle
    .
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  15. 15
    Then come back down
    .
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  16. 16
    For ending "miim", we'll start with the connecting line from the right, come up and over, then stop
    .
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  17. 17
    Bring the pen back around that curve
    .
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  18. 18
    Next, we will go down and straight across to the left
    .
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  19. 19
    Then create the tail
    .
    It looks like stand-alone "miim" with a connecting line from the right side.
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  20. 20
    Now, we have beginning, middle and ending "nuun"
    .
    Beginning "nuun" looks like a small rounded corner of a square with a single dot above.
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  21. 21
    Middle "nuun" has a connecting line from the right side
    .
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  22. 22
    Ending "nuun" looks like the stand-alone form with a connecting line from the right side
    .
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  23. 23
    This concludes today's tutorial on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet, Part 7
    .
    We were discussing the letters "laam", "miim" and "nuun". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Laam Miim Nuun

Haa Waaw Yaa

Hello, and thank you for watching VisiHow. Today, we have a series of tutorials on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet. If you are a non-native speaker, and you have always wanted to learn how to do this, we are going through the alphabet letter by letter, in order. We are learning how the letters are pronounced, how to write them in stand-alone letters, and to the left of the black line, how they connect to other letters when words are formed. This is Part 8. It is the final part in the series, dealing with the letters "haa", "waaw" and "yaa". We can remember when we're completing this tutorial that Arabic is written from the right side to the left side.

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Steps

  1. 1
    To make the letter "haa", we can start at the top, curve down, and come back up to connect it
    .
    It is almost like a teardrop shape. It's not quite a circle.
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  2. 2
    To make "waaw", we can start on the line, come up, and make a circle
    .
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  3. 3
    Then go down and slightly to the left side
    .
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  4. 4
    To make the letter "yaa", we can start by making a small curve, almost like a "C"
    .
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  5. 5
    Then we will go back around and come up
    .
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  6. 6
    We will then place two dots just below
    .
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  7. 7
    The letter "haa" has a beginning, a middle, and an ending form
    .
    In the beginning, we can start a circle.
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  8. 8
    Then as we come up, we will curve back around
    .
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  9. 9
    Finally, we'll continue the line
    .
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  10. 10
    In the middle, we have one line coming from the right
    .
    We can come below the line.
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  11. 11
    Connect it up like a wing
    .
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  12. 12
    Then make a figure 8
    .
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  13. 13
    Finally, continue on to the left side
    .
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  14. 14
    For ending "haa", we have the connecting line from the right side coming up
    .
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  15. 15
    Make a small line coming back down
    .
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  16. 16
    Then come back around so that it looks like a "C" that is connecting to a line
    .
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  17. 17
    "Waaw" connects from the right side, but not to anything on the left side, so there is only a beginning form, and an ending form
    .
    In the beginning, we have simply the stand-alone version.
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  18. 18
    At the end, we add a little connecting line on the right side
    .
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  19. 19
    "Yaa" has a beginning, middle, and ending form as well
    .
    We can start just slightly up from the line, come down, and rest it following the line.
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  20. 20
    Then place two dots just below
    .
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  21. 21
    For the middle, we will add a line connecting from the right side
    .
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  22. 22
    On the end, we will have a line that connects from the right side onto the stand-alone format
    .
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  23. 23
    This concludes our tutorial today on reading and writing the Arabic alphabet
    .
    This is Part 8, the final part in the series, for the letters "haa", "waaw" and "yaa". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please leave them in the space below.
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Video: Read and Write Consonants in Arabic Haa Waaw Yaa

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Categories : Communications & Education

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